Sunday, December 8, 2019

Opioid Producers Put Blame on Addicts

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola
December 03, 2019

 Story at-a-glance

  • Opioid overdoses kill more than 130 people in the U.S. daily in an unprecedented crisis that continues to spiral out of control
  • Purdue Pharma, which manufactures OxyContin, was instrumental in driving up sales of the drug to close to $2 billion a year by 2004
  • As it became clear that people were dying from opioids, Purdue Pharma engaged in extensive damage-control tactics, including suggesting that the people dying from opioids were already drug addicts
  • Purdue Pharma hired notorious PR firm Dezenhall Resources, which helped spread the opioid anti-story — the idea that pain patients who may lose access to opioids were the true victims of the opioid crisis
  • In September 2019, Purdue Pharma filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy as part of a deal to settle the more than 2,000 lawsuits it’s currently facing
  • Mundipharma, which is selling OxyContin in China, is using many of the same marketing tactics Purdue Pharma is now being accused of
Opioid overdoses kill more than 130 people in the U.S. daily1 in an unprecedented crisis that continues to spiral out of control. The pharmaceutical companies behind these drugs are now facing mounting lawsuits, as it's become clear that they're the ones with blood on their proverbial hands, having pushed drugs on unsuspecting pain patients while knowing they were unsafe.
From 1999 to 2017, more than 702,000 people died from a drug overdose and, in 2017, this was a leading cause of injury-related deaths in the U.S. Of the 70,000 drug-overdose deaths that occurred that year, 68% involved opioids.2
Purdue Pharma, which manufactures OxyContin, was instrumental in driving up sales of the drug to close to $2 billion a year by 2004,3 and as it became clear that people were dying as a result, they engaged in every damage-control tactic they could think of, even suggesting that the only people dying from opioids were already drug addicts.
In a major exposé by ProPublica, the lengths Purdue Pharma went to downplay OxyContin's risks are revealed. In short, ProPublica senior reporter David Armstrong wrote, "OxyContin's makers delayed the reckoning for their role in the opioid crisis by funding think tanks, placing friendly experts on leading outlets, and deterring or challenging negative coverage."4

Read and learn more here>>>https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/12/03/opioid-producers-put-blame-on-addicts.aspx?cid_source=dnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art2HL&cid=20191203Z1&et_cid=DM402953&et_rid=762391121

WebMD and Healthline Exposed Violating Your Privacy

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola
December 04, 2019

 Story at-a-glance

  • Dozens of popular health websites are tracking, storing and sharing your personal data without explicit consent, including WebMD (the leading health website) and Healthline (currently the third most popular health site)
  • Of 100 health websites, 78% shared user data with DoubleClick, Google’s advertising arm, while 48% shared data with Amazon. Facebook, Microsoft and AppNexus, another advertising firm, also received user data
  • This kind of information sharing is illegal in Europe. The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation requires websites to request and obtain explicit consent for the sharing of “special category data,” which includes health data
  • Google claims it does not build advertising profiles from sensitive data and does not permit advertisers to use such data to target ads, yet if not used for advertising, what is the health data being used for, and why is it collected and shared in the first place?
  • A report by the data privacy advocacy group Privacy International revealed mental health websites are also sharing sensitive personal data with third parties without the consent required under EU law. Some websites shared data with third parties in HTTP rather than HTTPS, which means the data, which contains unique identifiers, is susceptible to interception by hackers as well
read and learn more here>>> https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/12/04/medical-data-sharing.aspx?cid_source=dnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art1HL&cid=20191204Z1&et_cid=DM402929&et_rid=762988506

Monday, November 11, 2019

Substance Use And Abuse

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Statistics

Last Updated: October 17, 2019

If you are thinking of seeking treatment for yourself or a loved one, you are not alone. The number of people suffering from addiction in America is astounding. Let’s take a look at some numbers starting with adolescents.  read and learn more here>>>https://americanaddictioncenters.org/rehab-guide/addiction-statistics

Substance Use, Abuse, and Addiction

The 11 symptoms of Substance Use Disorder   

Will Meek Ph.D.

The single most common reason people seek counseling across the world is for substance use problems. I'd personally estimate that 40% of people I have worked with over my career either primarily focused on a substance use issue, or had that as a secondary concern. The following is a brief overview of how to determine the severity of any level of use.

Quick note: In this article when I use the term "substance," I am referring to any type of intoxicant (alcoholmarijuananicotinecaffeineopiates, narcotics, prescription meds, hallucinogens, etc).

Additionally, there is a lot of debate among psychologists, legal experts, doctors, philosophers, and sociologists on whether using any type of illegal substances even once is "OK." Instead of taking a position on that, this article will generally be written from a practical, open stance that accepts that we are curious, sensation-seeking beings that can make choices to have various experiences in our lives, some of which have been determined to be illegal by our governments or institutions we are affiliated with. This article is not going to cast many moral judgment or advocate any side, but instead will lay out the knowledge and facts about this subject.

Symptoms of Substance Use   learn more here>>>https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/notes-self/201401/substance-use-abuse-and-addiction